The second generation

Regolo proves himself a worthy son of his father. He believes in the company, has a great passion for wine, and works tirelessly to consolidate and make Sartori even more respected in the market.

The headquarters is always Villa Maria, an investment grandfather Pietro had probably already imagined as the ideal place to raise his family and his company.

A true gentleman, devoted exclusively to his profession and his family, Regolo was regarded as a rather talented wine broker with an extraordinary palate. He loved to care for it as a violinist does his hands.

Regolo used to personally prepare his wines for his customers, who, at the end of the “composition” would affix their signatures on the barrel, confirming their approval of the blend.

Today, Sartori reproduces this way of working on a large scale. Sartori = tailoring, in nomen, omen! (in a name, an omen!). Just as a tailor styles, Sartori measures, sketches the design, chooses the fabrics and finally creates the suit–the blend, the wine–which will walk down the world’s most prestigious “catwalks” and shine in a glass of Amarone or Soave Classico, the quintessence of Made in Verona, Italy.

After the Second World War, in 1947 Sartori officially starts to produce and market its wines. The company grows, the numbers become significant, and expansion remains a priority for Regolo. He improves the technology, buys new vehicles, and works without ever accepting and using, in his own vocabulary, the word “holiday.”

But in 1952, Regolo dies, and his two young sons, despite the difficulties, assume control of the company. Pierumberto, in the jargon of the family, becomes Foreign Minister and looks after the business side, while Franco assumes the title, Minister of the Interior, or in other words, production and personnel management.